Tech glitch delays results of Iowa caucus

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Tech glitch delays results of Iowa caucus

Iowa welcome sign

Iowa welcome sign

Ken Lund (Flickr)

Iowa welcome sign

Ken Lund (Flickr)

Ken Lund (Flickr)

Iowa welcome sign

Ivana Venema-Nunez, Reporter

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Polling update results started at 5 p.m. EST on Tuesday, after a glitch from the mobile application Shadow Inc., spotted partial results that further delayed the results of the Iowa Caucus.

In the live updates from The New York Times, as of 6:10 p.m., former mayor of South Bend, Pete Buttigieg, is first in the polling at 26.9%.  Senator Bernie Sanders is second at 25.1%, followed by Senator Elizabeth Warren at 18.3%.  Former Vice President Joseph Biden was fourth at 15.6%, with Amy Klobuchar polling at 12.6% and Andrew Yang at 1%.

The results are reported at 62% in, at this moment.

Today, the candidates arrived in New Hampshire without knowing the results and have stated their concerns and frustrations with the delay and their inability to state their victories.

The reason for having their victories stated is to set confidence within their voting blocks. 

The first reason for the delay was because precinct leaders couldn’t download the app or log in and later the main problem came from a coding error in a secondary system of Shadow Inc., a Democratic tech firm,  that was supposed to report figures to the state party completely, but was only doing so partially.  

The secondary system was later fixed.  

Shadow Inc. tweeted a statement earlier today.

“We sincerely regret the delay in the reporting of the results of last night’s Iowa caucuses and the uncertainty it has caused to the candidates, their campaigns, and Democratic caucus-goers,” the Tweet said.

Ellen Nakashima, reported today, for The Washington Post, that Democratic Senator Mark Warner, vice chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, stated that the Department of Homeland Security ensured there is no indication of “malicious cyber activity” related to the delay of voting results.